Hospital Sitter

Maintain contact with family members and report in on how things are going, help be your “eyes and ears” and ensure that medical providers direct questions or information to you if your loved one may not be able to accurately report:

Malaysian Care Givers (22)

Help relieve family caregivers by taking “shifts” such as staying overnight so you can get some rest while you stay with a loved one during the days and manage their care. This can also be a great help for long-distance caregivers who cannot be present or cannot arrive immediately.

Help oversee safety and ensure fall precautions are maintained. The hospital sitter can help call for further assistance, reassure your loved one when upset or waiting on help and remind the patient about precautionary measures.

Observe changes or concerns and notify family members and medical professionals, which may help more rapidly diagnosis problems such as delirium, medication incidents and infections.

Malaysian Care Givers (19)

Provide companionship and stimulation and help with “the little things”. A sitter can read to your loved one, do puzzles or other games, chat and reminisce, or even just help work the TV remote to find a program your loved one will enjoy. The companionship can be a great comfort and relieve loneliness and anxiety. Knowing your loved one has the company of the sitter can also help relieve your anxiety and allow you to rest so you can be the best advocate and balance your multiple responsibilities. A hospital sitter can make sure your loved one has on her special robe or massage in some hand lotion, help make a phone call to a grandchild and other “little things” that mean a lot and can help the healing process.

Returning Home After Discharge

Maintain contact with family members and report in on how things are going, help be your “eyes and ears” and ensure that medical providers direct questions or information to you if your loved one may not be able to accurately report:

Malaysian Care Givers (20)

After leaving the hospital, you may think that the worst is behind you. However, the transition from hospital to home can be a critical time for seniors and their health. Seniors may experience complications from their recent hospital stay, resulting in another hospital admission. In fact, 28% of patients discharged from the hospital are readmitted within just 30 days.

Malaysian Care Givers (21)

However, having a caregiver throughout the transition process and into a senior’s recovery can greatly improve their overall health and outcome — especially in high-risk discharges from the hospital. Because of COVID-19, many hospitals and facilities are discharging seniors early, which can be detrimental to their recovery. In this post, we will explore how a caregiver can help a senior after they are discharged from the hospital to help increase chances for a successful recovery.

In-House Caregiver

Maintain contact with family members and report in on how things are going, help be your “eyes and ears” and ensure that medical providers direct questions or information to you if your loved one may not be able to accurately report:

Malaysian Care Givers (18)
Malaysian Care Givers (19)
  • Activities of Daily Living (ADL) includes helping patients with bathing, changing diapers, transferring patients, personal hygiene care, oral feeding or tube feeding (if needed).
  • Medical Escort: Our caregivers are able to company patients to hospital or clinics to follow up or checkup, according to the time and transport arranged by the client.
  • Food & Nutritious: Our caregivers are able to support daily nutritious needs for the patients by helping them to control diet according to patients’ specific needs.
  • Monitoring vial sign: Checking is important to make sure that patients are in good condition all the time. This procedure includes blood pressure, temperature, respiration and glucose level checking.

Our Job Scopes

  1. Personal hygiene and grooming-this includes bathing, oral care, changing diapers, dirty clothing’s and linens to clean one.
  2. Pre-op and post op care
  3. Physiotherapy and Simple Massage
  4. Wound and Bedsore Management
  5. Suctioning
  6. Tracheostomy care
  7. Ostomy / Colostomy Care
  8. CPAP/BIPAP Management
  9. Insertion and feeding of Naos Gastric Tube, TPN feeding and administration, PEG feeding and management.
  10. Injections (medications), IV antibiotic administration
  11. Accompany patient to appointments and Acquaintances
  12. Proper technique in transferring patient from bed to wheelchair, to car and lifting.
  13. Falls precaution and prevention
  14. Newborn Care
  15. Proper nursing techniques and education a road to recovery to help patient obtain self-independent if the nurse will leave them.
  16. Everyday report of assessment to families.

ALL PRICE ARE BASED ON PATIENT'S CONDITION UPON ASSESSMENT

STAY OUT CAREGIVERS

Semi-dependent (Wheel Chair) & Fully-dependent (Bedridden)

STAY IN CAREGIVER

Semi-dependent (Wheel Chair) & Fully-dependent (Bedridden)

HOSPITAL SITTER

Semi-dependent (Wheel Chair) & Fully-dependent (Bedridden)